Quick Question: What is the Difference between Standard and Overflow Capacity?

Standard Capacity and Overflow capacity are two integral measurements that make up a bottle. Be careful, however, as these measurements are actually two very different numbers, and if they are confused, can lead to incorrect fill of your bottle and error in label claim.

Standard Capacity is the normal, commercial volume (commonly measured in cc’s, ml’s, or ounces) of a bottle. Simply stated, the amount of space inside the container for a given amount of product, published in standard sizes used by industry. When a bottle is filled to standard capacity, the contents usually fill up to its shoulder area.

Overflow capacity is the maximum volume of a bottle if the contents were filled to the very top (or the brim). The overflow helps manufacturers determine if the product will fit in a certain bottle style.

How are these measurements useful, you may ask? Imagine you are reviewing a 8oz glass bottle but would need a bottle to fill 250cc of liquid inside. A quick conversion will reveal that the standard capacity is only 236.59 cc. But if the bottle’s technical drawing states the bottle has an actual overflow capacity of 265cc, you can potentially fill 250cc of liquid in this “8oz” glass bottle without any issue.

Keep in mind, however, that different product application and closure choices may require different headspace, so make sure you test fill your product and determine the best solution.

Make sure to check the overflow of the bottle (either on the product detail page on oberk.com or the manufacturer’s technical drawing) to ensure that the content fits and the label claim in correct.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact us below!

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